BONUS EPISODE Father’s Day with Gary Wilson

June 21, 2020 00:32:00
BONUS EPISODE Father’s Day with Gary Wilson
Words That Move Me with Dana Wilson
BONUS EPISODE Father’s Day with Gary Wilson

Jun 21 2020 | 00:32:00

/

Show Notes

This episode makes abundantly clear where I get my emotionality, and love for music.  Dad, thank you for dropping the knowledge, the memories, and the teardrops in this podcast. I love you.

Show Notes:

Donate to the Words That Move Me Community

WTMM Membership: Join Here  

Follow us on IG & Tiktok 

View Full Episode Transcript

View Full Transcript

Episode Transcript

Speaker 0 00:03 This is words that move me, the podcast where movers and shakers, like you get the information and inspiration. You need to navigate your creative career with clarity and confidence. I am your host master mover, Dana Wilson. And if you're someone that loves to learn, laugh and is looking to rewrite the starving artist story, then sit tight, but don't stop moving because you're in the right place. Hello. Hello everybody. And welcome to a very, very special father's day bonus episode of words that move me. I am super jazzed about this because I am super currently holding my phone that is connected to my dad who is in Hopi Arizona. Dad say hi to everybody. Speaker 1 00:56 Hi everybody. Speaker 0 00:57 Ah, well Daddy-O thanks for joining me. Thank you for doing this. I appreciate you taking the time away from saving tooth lives. To talk to me here on the podcast. Um, I'm jazzed about it. How is your day going so far? Speaker 1 01:12 Yes, yes. Yes. My day on the Hopi reservation is going quite well. It's a beautiful day here on the wrist, about 85 degrees and just a breath of fresh breeze. And that's highly unusual because it's usually a sustained 35 mile an hour winds. Speaker 0 01:28 Oh, well, I'm glad that you are getting a breeze free moment, although you do look so good when you're windblown. Speaker 1 01:36 Dang. Speaker 0 01:37 Um, well, I thought it would be fun today to do a little cross interview. So I have some questions prepared for you and I think, I hope you have some questions prepared for me. Speaker 1 01:51 I do. Speaker 0 01:52 Okay. Very cool. Who wants to start? Do you want to start? Should I start? Speaker 1 01:56 Oh, well, um, since I'm elder. Okay. So my first question for you, my daughter is what is your best childhood memory? Speaker 0 02:14 Uh, okay. My best childhood memory and one of my fondest, oddly, because it also includes a, a moment that was not so pleasant was when we took a family trip to Hawaii, something to do with a dance competition, a showstoppers competition, I think. And it was like a Tiki night and I, there was a buffet of some sort and we were going through the buffet and I grabbed some papaya, I think. And I think you told me that it would be very delicious and I should try it. And I remember trying it and it tasting like a foot to me and I very much did not like papaya at all. That is simply one of the memories that came to my mind, but it's a fond memory because it's a fond memory because although I did travel a lot as a kid, we didn't take that many full family trips. Mom was a flight attendant. Um, and we traveled a bit with grandma and grandpa and sometimes just one of the siblings, but that was a full family event. And I, I even remember the elevator Bay, somehow the elevator Bay of that hotel. I don't know how, how old I used to been maybe six or seven. Speaker 1 03:32 Yeah, very, very young. And I too remember that trip to Hawaii, but it's interesting that I have no recollection of the, my red prosection, uh, is of, uh, the football camp. That was the whole purpose of, of going over there because as I remember that it was the, um, um, gosh, it was the some type of all star game and I can't, I think it was, um, the NFL for the life of me. Isn't that crazy? I cannot remember. I do remember being in the stadium and, uh, I do remember, uh, una GRI performing. That was, that was a great, great memory night for sure. Speaker 0 04:16 That was a good trip. Um, actually that I, you and I are on are so on the same page, my next, or one of my questions to you is tell me about a memory that you have of being my dad. Speaker 1 04:32 Well, I have, I have two memories that really, really stand out. And when I think back to, you know, you growing up and, um, one memory is the, uh, uh, you know, we, we always had, um, you guys involved in dancing and, uh, you know, competitions and, um, those types of things, um, early on, you know, and, uh, I think you were, you were three at the time and, um, it was your first win, if you will, at the competition. I remember, uh, having a picture taken of you with the trophy and the kneeling down where you were, um, about the size of the tropes. Speaker 0 05:24 Yeah. I think I have this photo I'm going to have to share it. I'll make sure to share it. Speaker 1 05:29 Yeah. Yeah. So that was a very, very fun memory, um, for, uh, for, for me. And, you know, because, uh, you, you won the competition and I'm one of the very worst memories I have of you growing up yeah. Was when you fell and broke your arm. And, um, I was, um, at work at the time and somehow you, you got, uh, notified me through nine 11 or I don't know who the hell it was that I was notified that I came down to the hospital and saw your X Ray of that doc, a broken arm. And it just absolutely crushed me. Speaker 0 06:14 Yeah. Bone Sprake Daddy-O that's, that's a thing. Yeah. Speaker 1 06:20 Very badly. Speaker 0 06:20 Yes I did. Oh gosh. I remember that day too. I was very upset that they cut off my pants and my shirt. And I was very upset because those were my favorite pants. And that was one of my favorite shirts. And at the time, I don't know if you recall this, but I very much did not like shopping because I very much did not like the way that clothes felt and fit my body. And I had found these pants and this shirt that I really, really loved, and those guys just cut them off because the truth was you could not take the shirt off, uh, the way that the shirt usually comes off, because there were bones sticking out of the arm. So I think they were going for, uh, the path of least resistance. And they, I did have to go under general anesthesia for them to set it. I remember waking up from that with a very, very sore throat from being intubated and having to use the restroom very, very badly because I, I guess the incident happened when I was on the way home from school, which would have put in about two 30 in the afternoon. And then I woke up at something like 9:00 PM and hadn't yet hadn't used the facilities yet. Speaker 1 07:34 That was a bad memory. But, um, yeah, those things, you know, those are, those are things that stick out in my mind. Okay. I'll go next. Yes. Um, number two, what one individual personal quality set you apart from all others who are auditioning for your first Justin Timberlake tour. Speaker 0 07:55 Oh, okay, cool. I, Oh man. That is a great quote. Wow. Dad, that is like super journalist level question. Um, Speaker 0 08:06 I believe, well, you get ready cause you're next. One's hard too. Um, I believe that the thing that set me apart most in that situation was my relationship with Marty Kudelka. I, I, you know, he had asked me if I would assist him on the tour, but I remember feeling a moment like a fork in the road. Like I need to make sure he knows that I want to dance. And I remember having a conversation with him where I said, I really want to dance. And he was surprised. He seemed to believe, and this is so not, not uncommon that, um, an assistant choreographer ranks higher than a dancer in the hierarchy of the entertainment world. Um, dancers are called the talent and then there's the creatives, right? The choreography team directors and stuff like that. So, um, he, he believed that I was excited to be part of the, the choreography team versus wanting to be a performer. So it was a huge, uh, moment where I let him know. And once he knew, he said, okay, get out there, audition with everybody else. And I auditioned, uh, with everybody else, but I do believe it's our, our report and our friendship. That was, um, the thing that, that really sealed the deal for me. I think I should ask him, I should ask. I should ask him Speaker 1 09:35 That you've always been so, so, so if that's the case where you know, you've got talent and then you've got the creation at what, at what point did you feel like moving from a dancer to a choreographer? Speaker 0 09:51 Um, it's interesting. I don't think there was ever one shift. Um, even still today, I consider myself a dancer first, but I get most excited about making things. Um, and usually the way that my world works, especially right now, given our kind of locked down COVID circumstances. I am the one to be dancing my own work. Um, and so I, I get to have both most of the time and I think that's the way I like it. Speaker 1 10:27 So you're up here. You are a choreo dancer. Speaker 0 10:30 I am a quarry or a dancer. Yes, indeed. A choreo dancer teacher. Yeah. Okay. Here, this one's a doozy. Are you ready? I'm letting you know, I might cry. Okay. So I read something online recently, it was a tweet or a thing or something that a woman posted. And this is a woman that I do not know, but she said, is there anything we can do to make father's day less awful for those of us that don't have our fathers anymore? And I thought I would pose that question to you. How, how do you think you would answer that question? Speaker 1 11:10 Well, Speaker 0 11:12 It's a tough one. I told you, I'm sorry. I'm sorry to do this to you. Speaker 1 11:17 Well, you know how emotional I get to, Speaker 0 11:19 I know Daddy-O one of my favorite memories of you being my dad when we grew up is that you cried every time we watched rescue nine 11, Speaker 1 11:32 You know, losing anyone, you know, in your family is horrible. Speaker 0 11:36 <inaudible> Speaker 1 11:37 Um, about of course, losing your father is, um, the ability of, you know, emotional trauma. You know, I'm looking back to when, when I lost my dad, Speaker 0 11:51 <inaudible>, Speaker 1 11:57 It's been 15 years. So I'm still around for you. Speaker 0 12:15 Me too, dad, me too. I'm glad. And I'm so glad that we're getting to have this conversation and I'm glad that I am getting to record it with my phone and this microphone and I can have it forever. Speaker 1 12:29 No more, no more tough question. Speaker 0 12:31 Okay. I promise. But I'll, I'll, I'll take a stab at answering that question. I am not a parent and I actually have trouble wrapping my head around how I would teach a child about a parent leaving or death itself, but I will never forget. And I love the way that Adrian, my sister taught her daughter little Millie, my niece, your granddaughter, Adrian taught Millie that when somebody dies, their body goes away, but they live in our hearts and in our minds forever. And so to someone who doesn't have a father with them in body today, I would say to have a moment with them in your heart and in your mind. And in my case, I'm having one with you in my hand here in my phone and in my heart and in my mind. And it makes me so emotional because I love you so much. It's a big, big feel. And I am here. We are both feeling big fields in a puddle on the floor, on a microphone. Speaker 1 13:47 I, all I can say is that such a special way to, to teach your daughter, you know, about, about the circle of life. And I'm just really, really proud to be your dad. Speaker 0 14:04 I am proud to be your, your tiny dancer. That's a funny story, by the way, Speaker 1 14:11 Every time it comes on, I turn it up to at least nine. Speaker 0 14:15 I remember being around a big group of people when I was leaving you a message one day and I called and I said, Hey, D Boba, it's your TD. I'm just calling to say, I love you. And I hung up the phone and my friends were like, okay, number one, who is, who is Dee Devo boss? And number two, what is a T D? And I was like, Oh, I am my dad's tiny dancer period at the end. Okay. Speaker 1 14:50 Okay. Whose turn is it? Is it my turn? Speaker 0 14:52 Your attorney go. Speaker 1 14:54 Okay. Um, where do you see yourself in one year? Five years. In 10 years. Speaker 0 15:01 Ooh, good one. Okay. Um, in one year I see myself with a Hm, with a business, which is centered around, um, movement coaching. And, um, I see Daniel and I preparing to buy a building, um, in five years, Daniel, Daniel, and I will be in that building and we will be bursting at the seams. I will be in need of more space because I'll have a massive team and a company, and we'll be putting on shows and Daniel will have more CNCS and three D printers and laser cutters than we have space for. And at that five year Mark, we'll be ready to ready for more space. And then in the 10 year Mark, I see us living in what I call the Emerald city. The Emerald city to me is a warehouse, a workshop that's big enough that we can have our own little domestic, tiny little house inside of it. And it'll have a white picket fence and a AstroTurf and a dog. And we'll golf, we'll golf cart. We will golf cart from one side of it to the other to, uh, visit each other in our separate workstations. Speaker 1 16:28 Well, let me, that's a fantastic plan and I can envision it, uh, you know, happening. I, I know exactly what it is that you guys want to do. And I hope that you can still do that in California, that it's not so crazy, and you can see your dreams fulfilled there. And that, that would be great. So the obvious question that I have with regard to follow up would be if you get a dog kind of dog eat, Speaker 0 16:57 Oh my God, dad, that is a great question. And it's really difficult to answer because Daniel and I who see eye to eye on just about everything, seem at odds when it comes to, uh, breed preference on the dog friend. So I know, I know, I mean, there is only one dog. There is only one dog. Shall we say it at the same time? I'll count down from three. Okay, here we go. Three, two, one engage. Yes. There was some lag there, but that's, that's the only kind of dog that I see, um, a Bobo. That's what it has to be for me. However, Daniel favors brains over brute Daniel would prefer a smart dog. I would prefer a stupid dog. Um, so Daniel was in favor more of the like German shepherd or a lab, or, uh, some, even, even a mutt, somebody that's smarter than a lump on a log bulldog whose favorite thing to do is drew and fart. Speaker 1 18:07 Yeah. That's exactly why you love them. And you've got, if you have the Emerald city, I mean, with, with the warehouse approach, can't anything dirty all over walls and your even know it's there. Speaker 0 18:26 And because the Emerald city will be massive, we can probably have both. And because of our preferences, they'll probably both have hip dysplasia and require all sorts of special attention. Really, truly. If we do the dog thing, we'll probably adopt and we'll find a, a mutt and we'll find a little dog that needs a home, but you and I both know there is, it is a very special experience. Speaker 1 18:54 There's no experience quite like one. Speaker 0 18:56 No, no. Um, okay. Final questions here. This one's my turn. And then you do your last one. So this might be, this might be a tough one. We might be opening up the thing, but this is an opportunity to pass down all the wisdom in the world. My question is what is the most important thing you learned from your dad? Speaker 1 19:19 The most important thing that I hope to impart to you would be, uh, the quality of critical thinking so that when something comes your way, you can, uh, define it. You can identify it, you can, um, just assemble it and make a decisions based on critical fond. Speaker 0 19:52 Daddio I love this answer. In fact, it was just last week's episode that I talked about the Socratic method and Socratic questioning. Speaker 1 20:02 Well, so crates was a great man. Speaker 0 20:04 Oh, turns out his, uh, his questioning methods put him strongly out of favor of the majority of the community. And he was put to death as a result of being, of being the nutso popular guy at the Acropolis. Speaker 1 20:20 Okay. Do I have one last one? Okay. What single event pushed you to move to Los Angeles? Speaker 0 20:30 Whoa, that is a great question. I, there, there was obviously a strand of several small events, but I think the one moment where I knew that I had to do it was after school one day, watching music videos in front of the TV. And I, I'm not so proud of this, but the music video that I was watching to today's standard is not like an earth shatteringly, remarkable, really cool music video. Um, but it it's something about it really got me jazzed. The dancers were wearing me pads and cutoff shorts, and they looked so cool. And I was like that. I want to do that. And oddly enough, I have never worn me pads or cut off shorts in a music video. Um, but I have, I have done things and been a part of projects beyond my wildest dreams. And, um, certainly I have that moment among many things to thank for that. Speaker 1 21:45 I'll tell you, I'll tell you what though. When, when you came to me and you said that I'm moving to Los Angeles, I wish I had a picture of your expression that would have come across my face. First of all, my drop, my jaw dropped to the floor, obviously. Then the next question, the next thing out of my mouth was I, as I remember, it would have been Dana, why can't you do what you want to do in Denver? Speaker 0 22:17 Mm. You probably did ask me that question. A lot of people ask me that question and Speaker 1 22:23 Yeah, I think you have to go all the way out there to crazy LA LA land in order to pursue your dream. That was a crush. Speaker 0 22:31 I bet for you and mom, both, what is scary? What a scary thing Speaker 1 22:36 For scary for us, for us as your bed. But what I can't imagine, maybe were you fearful of making the move or was it just an exciting adventure? Speaker 0 22:48 It was really an exciting adventure and I had a best friend in each arm as I made the drive. We actually caravanned out. I don't know if you remember, but you know, on that unified front, it felt like nothing could stop us from, from really doing it. You know? So I was excited. Speaker 1 23:09 Do you remember what car you drove? Speaker 0 23:11 The beetle, the beetle that you taught me, how to drive a stick shift in that car. And that is the car that, that, that brought me to LA it's the car that got me through my first year. And it is the car that I totaled on Magnolia and Woodman when I was going through a yellow and somebody was turning left and I was, I was on the phone with you when that happened. Speaker 1 23:36 And with me at the time with me at the time it happened, and I was absolutely distraught for a number of hours before you could, um, let me know what had happened. And it was just horrible. Speaker 0 23:53 Oh, dad, I, well, probably worse than watching me move to LA. I would imagine. Speaker 1 24:00 Yeah, it was not a good, uh, it was not a good sound when you got disconnected. Speaker 0 24:06 Oh, DDA on, on the note of worst sound. Can you tell me other than, um, I do think it is important that the audience know that when I was a baby, I carried the nickname, the Hornet because I was angry and cried a lot. Um, but I would love to know what is one of your favorite sounds? Speaker 1 24:26 Oh, um, one of my favorite sounds is a da engine at 8,000 RPM. Speaker 0 24:37 Great answer. I love that answer. Um, I would have to say that one of my favorite sounds is the sound of Daniel clacking away on his key, his mechanical keyboard at work. Um, he's got such a distinct typing sound. It's like little tiny hammers is very impressive and cool. And I just thinking about it brings a smile to my face. Yeah. Speaker 1 25:07 That's one of the neatest towns. So we've got music as you know, um, it's still in my heart and, um, I will, you know, um, never, ever regret. Um, you know, the time that, you know, I was in the band and, and played music and to this day, I, I, uh, anytime I'm driving, uh, and turn on the Sirius radio, I always go to the seventies and listen to the best music ever made. Speaker 0 25:42 That is that dad is a wonderful segue to talk about your group, the sons of Beethoven. What instrument did you play in, in the group, the sons of Beethoven. Speaker 1 25:53 But then I played, I played, I live in guitar and I'll never ever forget this because, um, at the time I was able to, well, dad bought me a Rickenbacker 12 string, which was the same a guitar that the birds used when they did mr. Canterbury man. And, um, uh, that was just the neatest guitar, uh, ever to our chairs and of the Beatles, uh, these ones, uh, in their early music, a 12 string also. And so to have one of those in the band was great. I, I played rhythm guitar there. And then, uh, after a while I moved from rhythm guitar to bass guitar and had a Hofner bass just like Paul McCartney did. So it was a great, great time, the memories that I have of those years, really from, from, uh, seventh grade. Um, and so I was like 12 from the time I was 12, till the time I was 18 was spent, you know, every weekend we would play reservoir dances, or I remember, you know, download the band. Uh, those are the types of things growing up in Boulder that I remember most. And we would always play at our high school dances, uh, our junior high dances. Um, and I'm not, it was a tremendous opportunity to, uh, you know, experience, you know, the entertainment side of life. Of course, I never got to the level you achieve, but, um, it was a lot of fun. And, uh, I still miss, uh, you know, all the guys in the band. Speaker 0 27:42 Do you play ever, do you have, do you still have guitars around the house? Speaker 1 27:46 Yeah. Um, I still play, but, uh, I don't have near the talent. You know, one of the band members, uh, I believe is out in California right now, and his name is Pat Hubbard and, uh, pact was the genius behind everything. And he was so true musician, uh, with us and not, um, it was all because of path that we were able to take a record and listen to it and figure out the chords and, um, figure out, uh, how it was that we were going to, you know, master this thing. And, uh, so I would, uh, you know, listen to PAGA as he would tell me it was DGF, a minor, minor things. And, and, uh, but after, after school, every day we practice on the weekends we practice. And, um, that's how, uh, I remember my, uh, junior high and high school years. Speaker 0 28:45 That is so cool. DDA. One of the things that really struck me in my adult life relating to music is that I stumbled upon the Beatles as an adult. And I remember playing the white album and knowing all the words to it. I remember being like, Oh, let me try this one. This one looks cool. I must've been 18. And I listened to the white album and I knew all the words, which was so shocking because I thought I was hearing it for the first time. Turns out, obviously that is the music that was coming through your car speakers and around the house while I was growing up. And I knew it was in there, like it was really in there. And it was this out of body experience to be singing along to a song that I thought I was hearing for first time. Speaker 1 29:42 Yeah. One of the neatest things for me as a musician was to, um, realize that, uh, a generation later, you know, you and Adrian and Taylor all appreciated the Beatles music. And that's what for me was so formational. I mean, they were, they were, I dunno, I mean, once in a a hundred year type of band and the music that they, that they created is still in my mind as good today. 60 years later, 55, 55 years later, it was as good as the day. It was written. That's a true hallmark. You know, if you think of the bands that are, you know, are kind of a flash in the pan, you know, they might have done well for a year or two, but in a very short period of time, like, you know, from 63 to 70, maybe seven or eight years, the Beatles, what the Venus has done and what they accomplished and what they did for the musical industry beyond what anyone has ever done. I think, Speaker 0 30:56 I think you might be right. I don't know if I'm the gal to say it because I certainly am not a music historian, but I know that music struck such a chord in you and, and still vibrates through my bones right now. Speaker 1 31:11 It brings people together. And it's what makes people laugh and makes people cry. Speaker 0 31:16 Indeed, indeed. My dad, well, perhaps on that note, we sign it off and, um, wish everybody, it father's day, that's full of music and love and yes, even tears, if that is what it brings for you. Um, man, dad, I love you so much. I'm so grateful for, for this conversation free love. Speaker 1 31:37 Yeah. Um, I hope that, uh, we get a million listeners. Speaker 0 31:42 I do too. I also hope that we can, um, have better luck with zoom next time, although I'm so not mad at holding my phone between my face and the microphone. I love you to bits. Daddio have a great rest of your day. Speaker 1 31:55 Okay. Love you. Bye Daniel.

Other Episodes

Episode 0

October 26, 2022 00:26:27
Episode Cover

147. Audition Burnout

This week, we’re talking about a few of the ways audition burnout can happen at different career stages, and then we dig in on...

Listen

Episode 0

November 18, 2020 00:38:56
Episode Cover

47. Lady Boss: Diana Matos

What happens when the commercial industry doesn’t make you happy anymore… Reinvention, that’s what!  My guest this week is a pro at exactly that.  ...

Listen

Episode 0

February 02, 2022 00:52:53
Episode Cover

110. Taking Care IN Business with the Wing It Girl, Cat Rendic

Cat Rendic comes from a long line of Entertainment business lineage. In this episode, we talk about the thrills of performing, choreographing, and teaching...

Listen